New Age

The New Age movement is a Western spiritual movement that developed in the second half of the 20th century. Its central precepts have been described as “drawing on both Eastern and Western spiritual and metaphysical traditions and infusing them with influences from self-help and motivational psychologyholistic healthparapsychology, consciousness research and quantum physics“.[2] It aims to create “a spirituality without borders or confining dogmas” that is inclusive and pluralistic.[3] It holds to “a holistic worldview,”[4] emphasising that the Mind, Body and Spirit are interrelated[1] and that there is a form of Monism and unity throughout the universe.[5] It attempts to create “a worldview that includes both science and spirituality”[6] and embraces a number of forms of mainstream science as well as other forms of science that are considered fringe.

According to author Nevill Drury, the origins of the movement can be found in the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly through the works of the esotericists Emanuel SwedenborgFranz MesmerHelena Blavatsky and George Gurdjieff, who laid some of the basic philosophical principles that would influence the movement. It would gain further momentum in the 1960s, taking influence from metaphysics, self-help psychology, and the various Indian gurus who visited the West during that decade.[7] The New Age movement includes elements of older spiritual and religious traditions ranging from atheism and monotheism through classical pantheismnaturalistic pantheismpandeism and panentheism to polytheism combined withscience and Gaia philosophy; particularly archaeoastronomyastronomyecologyenvironmentalism, the Gaia hypothesispsychology and physics. New Age practices and philosophies sometimes draw inspiration from major world religionsBuddhismTaoismChinese folk religionChristianity,HinduismIslamJudaismSikhism; with strong influences from East Asian religionsGnosticismNeopaganismNew ThoughtSpiritualism,TheosophyUniversalism and Western esotericism.[8] The term New Age refers to the coming astrological Age of Aquarius.[1]

Origins

The author Nevill Drury claimed there are “four key precursors of the New Age,” who had set the way for many of its widely held precepts.[3] The first of these was Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772), a Swedish scientist who after a religious experience devoted himself to Christian mysticism, believing that he could travel to Heaven and Hell and commune with angels, demons and spirits, and who published widely on the subject of his experiences.  The second person was Franz Mesmer (1734–1815), who had developed a form of healing using magnets, believing that there was a force known as “animal magnetism” that affected humans.  The third figure was the Russian Helena Blavatsky (1831–1891), one of the founders of the Theosophical Society, through which she propagated her religious movement of Theosophy, which itself combined a number of elements from Eastern religions like Hinduism and Buddhism with Western elements.  The fourth figure was George Gurdjieff (c. 1872–1949), who founded the philosophy of the Fourth Way, through which he conveyed a number of spiritual teachings to his disciples. A fifth individual whom Drury identified as an important influence upon the New Age movement was the Indian Swami Vivekananda (1863–1902), an adherent of the philosophy of Vedanta who first brought Hinduism to the West in the late 19th century.[9]

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